Art And Response

The Grio | White artist portrays ‘The Talk’ black parents have in powerful painting

January 19th, 2015

grio

“How do you explain to a kid that the world isn’t fair? That it isn’t safe?” artist Michael D’Antuono asks, referring to his latest painting, The Talk.

In the painting, no one in the room is smiling. Not Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Not President Obama. Not the mother and father who lean in towards their young black son to have “the talk.” The only ones smiling aren’t in the room; they’re on TV — a once bubbly but now deceased black boy sporting a hoodie and an older white cop, sporting his officer’s uniform and a smug grin. The news title flashing on the TV screen explains the strained mood: “No Indictment in Police Shooting of Unarmed Youth.”  (more…)

JET | “The Talk”

January 19th, 2015

jet

Art and response go hand-in-hand. Viewing an image or painting that evokes emotion and provokes thought that encourages conversation goes a long way in terms of deepening understanding of perception and society. (more…)

Global Grind | It’s Time To Make Dr. King’s Dream A Reality

January 15th, 2015

globalgrind

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, activist artist Michael D’Antuono is releasing “The Talk,” his painting highlighting the inconsistent progress America has made concerning racial justice since Dr. King’s historic Selma to Montgomery marches. Here, he writes about the inspiration behind the powerful painting.

Martin Luther King made great strides for racial equality, and a speech that will always be remembered. We will always be grateful for his accomplishments and sacrifice. My concern is that, while things are better now than they were in the 60’s, some events of the last couple of years have made me wonder if some of Dr. King’s progress is being intentionally eroded.  (more…)

FurFur (Russian Magazine)

March 6th, 2014

furfur

Work of the American artist Michael D’Antuono can safely be called “social pop art”: his style is almost comic book and is pretty easy to understand. Most of the images that he uses are recognizable worldwide. Nevertheless, they’re not just a colorful cloth: each of them affects the various problems of society.

Michael told us about the place of the artist in the modern world, double standards and street art.  (more…)

Not getting the picture!

December 26th, 2013

khaleej-times 26 December 2013

Less than a year after he became a symbol of apartheid in the US for shooting to death Black teen Trayvon Martin and calling it an act of self-defence, American George Zimmerman has made news again, this time triggered by his newly found love for painting.

The debutant artist, said to be deep in debt, has sold his first painting on eBay for an incredible $100,000 and more. It’s no less than another Christmas (more…)

Anti-Zimmerman Artwork Pulled Down by eBay as Zimmerman’s Painting Sells for $100K

December 24th, 2013

Media ITE by Matt Wilstein | 3:39 pm, 12/24/2013

If George Zimmerman can sell his first-ever painting for more than $100,000 on eBay, why shouldn’t another artist be able to sell his anti-Zimmerman piece for a fraction of that price?

On the same day that Zimmerman’s auction closed, eBay reportedly yanked a piece by artist Michael D’Antuono from the site that depicted a police officer in a Ku Klux Klan hood, who may or may not be Zimmerman, with his gun pointed at a young Trayvon Martin holding out a bag of Skittle-like “Sweeties.”

A Tale of Two Hoodies

A Tale of Two Hoodies

D’Antuono explained the situation on his blog:

On the same day that George Zimmerman closed his ebay auction of his painting for over $100,000, the online auctioneers removed my anti-racism painting inspired by the Zimmerman case, “A Tale Of Two Hoodies” for being “hateful or discriminatory.” While Zimmerman was allowed to capitalize on his ill-gotten notoriety, I was denied the opportunity to raise funds to help the very foundation named in honor of Zimmerman’s victim.

The artist went on to say that the bidding on his piece had just passed the $25,000 mark on day two of its auction, with half of the proceeds going to The Trayvon Martin Foundation. According to an email the artist received from eBay, items “promoting or glorifying hatred, violence, or racial or religious intolerance aren’t allowed.” The email specifically referenced the “images or icons associated with the KKK” in his piece. (more…)