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Michael D’Antuono info@artandresponse.com (845) 440-6634

Are Conservatives More Racist?

April 23rd, 2012

What One Piece Of Art Revealed

My new painting inspired by the Trayvon Martin tragedy called “A Tale Of Two Hoodies”, has created somewhat of a stir. A popular subject of blogs, it has been noted more than 17,000 times over the weekend. Most enlightening were the many disturbing responses on my site revealing a nation that sadly hasn’t come as far as I had thought. (more…)

ScottsMindField.com – Artist Michael D’Antuono Tells ‘A Tale of Two Hoodies’

April 21st, 2012

Scottscope

Artist Michael D’Antuono Tells ‘A Tale of Two Hoodies’

Saturday, April 21, 2012

[This is a localized version of the article originally published at ScottsMineField.com]

A young Black child in a white hoodie offers a policeman some of his Sweetiescandy.  The officer, who is wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood along with his uniform, points his police issue semi-automatic Glock pistol at the child’s head.  They both stand in front of an American flag, the center of which has been torn away to reveal the confederate battle flag underneath.

A Tale of Two Hoodies

The scenario described above isn’t from a fever nightmare.  It’s the scene depicted in artist Michael D’Antuono’s painting “A Tale of Two Hoodies.”  As the title suggests, it’s inspired by the Trayvon Martin murder.  It’s an inflammatory image, to be sure.  Some might call it extreme or even irresponsible.  Alas, Extreme emotions often require extreme measures to be properly articulated. (more…)

Could Cosby Be Wrong?

April 16th, 2012

Bill Cosby feels the Trayvon Martin case is about gun ownership, not race. As you can tell from my painting “A Tale Of Two Hoodies”, I think it may be a little of both.

The gun laws in many states are admittedly a little wacky, no doubt. Texas allows concealed weapons on campuses. While I’m sure professors in that state are giving better grades, it’s only a matter of time before we get some very disturbing headlines. Using Florida’s “Stand Your Ground Law” as a defense in the Trayvon Martin shooting should put both Zimmerman and the law itself away for life.

Okay, so I concede the whole “gun laws need reform thing.” Score one for the Cos. But I wouldn’t bet a box of Jello pudding that racism wasn’t a factor both with the perpetrator and the local authorities in the Trayvon Martin case. Just based on his comments while chasing Trayvon, one can deduce that the hispanic guy with the jewish name is a bit of a racist. Let’s call a spade a spade.

A more disturbing problem than one racist with a gun is the way the authorities treated the case until about a month of growing national protest. They John Doe’d Trayvon without contacting his parents even though they had all of his contact info in his wallet. Meanwhile, Zimmerman’s folks were called on the spot. The original investigator’s natural instinct to jail Zimmerman was nixed by a higher up, leaving our vigilante free to roam the streetswith the murder weapon hand. This did happen in Florida after all, and you can’t get any deeper south than that.

Dr. Cosby is right on guns, but perhaps a little too forgiving on the race issue. He may be overcompensating due to his support of Tawana Brawley in her case years ago, or just want’s to keep every body calm. Personally, I believe if people don’t get just a little angry at injustice, they won’t be motivated enough to change it.

Wagist – The Racist Art of Michael D’Antuono

April 13th, 2012

Scottscope

[This is a localized version of the article originally published at Wagist.com]

Artist Michael D’Antuono released his take on the Trayvon Martin shooting this week, with a piece entitled, “A Tale of Two Hoodies.”

Two Hoodies

It portrays George Zimmerman as Caucasian, wearing a police uniform and a KKK hood, and pointing his firearm directly at Trayvon Martin’s head. It shows Trayvon Martin as being approximately four feet tall, ten years old, and offering the gun-brandishing Zimmerman a pack of Sweeties candy. (more…)

Agabond.com – Michael D’Antuono “A Tale Of Two Hoodies”

April 4th, 2012

Abagond

Michael D’Antuono: A Tale of Two Hoodies

Saturday, April 4, 2012

[This is a localized version of the article originally published at Abagond.Wordpress.com]

A Tale of Two Hoodies

“A Tale of Two Hoodies” (2012) is an oil painting by Michael D’Antuono, a White American artist.  It shows a white policeman in a Klan hood holding a gun on a little black boy in a white hoodie while he holds up a bag of Sweeties that looks like a bag of Skittles. On the wall behind them a dirty American flag is partly peeled away to show the Confederate flag that whites fought under to defend slavery.

D’Antuono says of the painting:

Inspired by the Trayvon Martin case, this painting symbolizes the travesty of racially profiling innocent children and how present day prejudices affect policy.

The important word here is “inspired”. That means he was thinking about the Trayvon Martin case when he painted it, not that it is a painting of the Trayvon Martin case. It is not a piece of news reporting like this picture from the Vietnam War of a suspected traitor being shot in the head on the street:

Instead, like most of his pictures, it is about the state of America, much like Norman Rockwell’s “The Problem We All Live With” (1964):

“A Tale of Two Hoodies”, whether intended or not, shows at least three truths about race in America not seen through the white lens:

  1. The asymmetry of racism – Many whites see blacks and whites as being equally racist and equally powerful. Yet blacks are outnumbered by whites by more than 5 to 1. Whites have a hundred times more wealth. They run most of the institutions of society. That would not matter if they were not racist, but they are, so it does.  The picture shows that imbalance: not only does the white person hold the gun, he is older and bigger and is pointing the gundown at the black person, making it even more asymmetric than the Vietnam War picture. The picture can also be read as “stealing candy from a baby” – which pretty much sums up the relationship that whites have had with blacks from that moment some 500 years ago when they arrived in Africa with – guns.
  2. The Klan with the badge – That might seem over the top but it is not. The police and the Klan have a common root in the slave patrols. So much so that my picture of the police was pretty much that of a slave patrol – before I even knew what a slave patrol was! The police get away with murder, racially profile, act above the law and see blacks more as some kind of threat than as people to protect.
  3. Whites have not changed deep down – as shown by how the Confederate flag was right there behind the American flag the whole time. Most white people are like that. You can tell because they are more upset at being called a racist than at being a racist.

In that he painted about race in a Rockwellian style, it brings to mind ”The Problem We All Live With” and how little progress has been made.

The Art Of Corpacracy

March 22nd, 2012

With Corporate personhood, bailouts, tax breaks for the rich and entitlement cuts for the rest, one thing is clear, class warfare has been waged. Armed only with brush and canvas, artist, Michael D’Antuono fights back, by creating art that exposes the government’s servitude to the corporate elite. The rich and powerful use their vast resources to unfairly rig the system against the working man, thus monopolizing wealth and opportunity. Join the fight against them by sharing this video with as many people to raise awareness and motivation.